Press Releases

Posted: May 27, 2011
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Kayes, Mali, 21 May 2011 – The prime ministers of Mali and Senegal, accompanied by ministers from their respective governments and experts from both countries, met in Kayes, Mali, today to push for the application of reforms to facilitate trade between the two countries. USAID missions in Mali, Senegaland West Africa provided detailed recommendations on the subject to all present.
 
Senegal Prime Minister Souleymane Ndéné Ndiaye (middle) with Mali Prime Minister
Senegal Prime Minister Souleymane Ndéné Ndiaye (middle) with Mali Prime Minister Cissé Mariam Kaïdama Sidibé (right).
“There is a great deal of hope in applying the recommendations from this high-level meeting,” said Mor Talla Kane, a representative of the private sector in Senegal who attended the meeting. “Improving road governance, investment and infrastructure will reinforce trade, create jobs and increase revenues in both countries.”
 
During the meeting, the heads of government agreed to implement important recommendations,including:
 
  • Eliminating corruption along the Bamako-Dakar corridor, which is a drag on the free movement of goods, people and vehicles.
  • Limiting to three (3) the number of checkpoints for goods – one at the departure point, one at the border and one at the point of arrival – in accord with ECOWAS rules. The most recent UEMOA-USAID West Africa Trade Hub report on road governance shows that between Bamako and Dakar there are 12 active checkpoints in Mali and 33 in Senegal.
  • Implementing UEMOA axleweight rules that limit trucks to 11.5 tons per axle
  • Completing road maintenance projects on the corridor. The two countries pledged to work together to identify sources of financing necessary for the projects.
  • Instituting quarterly meetings of authorities to monitor and evaluate progress, which would alternate from one country to the other USAID Trade Hub studies on the gaps in the implementation of regional trade policies provided information and insights that led to the recommendations. 

Ibrahima Ba, the director of Senegalese agro-processing company SOCODIV, participated in the study in Senegal in 2010. His company sells the products of more than 500 farmers, fishers and other agro-processors, as well as those of Malian livestock herders in the sub-region.

“It’s important to apply the rules and eliminate corruption – this will have a major impact on trade,” Ba said. “That is the point of trade – we sell our products in Mali and they have products that we need. We need to implement the rules in order to reach a sufficient level of trade.”
Posted: Mar 1, 2011
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The Improved Road Transport Governance (IRTG) Initiative has released preliminary findings of its 14th report on road harassment on primary trade corridors in West Africa, reporting the level of checkpoints, bribes and delays observed from Oct. 1 to Dec. 31, 2010.

In Mali, the report shows:

  • Drivers experience 2.5 stops per 100 km at checkpoints operated by customs, police and gendarmes, which is the worst level of the six countries monitored under the joint USAID Trade Hub-UEMOA initiative (the others are Burkina Faso, Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Senegal and Togo).
  • Delays average 29 minutes per 100 km in Mali, the worst among the countries monitored.
  • The level of bribes paid in Mali is second only to Cote d’Ivoire. Between Bamako and Zégoua, drivers pay an average of 19,500 FCFA per 100 km per trip; between Bamako and Diboli, they pay 21,000 FCFA per 100 km and between Bamako and Sona, they pay 32,000 FCFA per 100 km. These amounts are paid by drivers whose vehicles have been inspected and deemed roadworthy and whose documentation is also in order – they should not  be paying any penalties at all, in effect. 

The free circulation of goods and people is far from being a reality. Numerous checkpoints along interstate corridors are obstacles to transport and trade – and harm West Africa’s ability to compete in international markets. 

Financed by USAID West Africa and jointly implemented by UEMOA and the USAID West Africa Trade Hub, the IRTG initiative began monitoring road harassment in 2005.

Posted: Sep 2, 2010
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Press header image
Posted: May 27, 2011
Body:
Kayes, Mali, 21 May 2011 – The prime ministers of Mali and Senegal, accompanied by ministers from their respective governments and experts from both countries, met in Kayes, Mali, today to push for the application of reforms to facilitate trade between the two countries. USAID missions in Mali, Senegaland West Africa provided detailed recommendations on the subject to all present.
 
Senegal Prime Minister Souleymane Ndéné Ndiaye (middle) with Mali Prime Minister
Senegal Prime Minister Souleymane Ndéné Ndiaye (middle) with Mali Prime Minister Cissé Mariam Kaïdama Sidibé (right).
“There is a great deal of hope in applying the recommendations from this high-level meeting,” said Mor Talla Kane, a representative of the private sector in Senegal who attended the meeting. “Improving road governance, investment and infrastructure will reinforce trade, create jobs and increase revenues in both countries.”
 
During the meeting, the heads of government agreed to implement important recommendations,including:
 
  • Eliminating corruption along the Bamako-Dakar corridor, which is a drag on the free movement of goods, people and vehicles.
  • Limiting to three (3) the number of checkpoints for goods – one at the departure point, one at the border and one at the point of arrival – in accord with ECOWAS rules. The most recent UEMOA-USAID West Africa Trade Hub report on road governance shows that between Bamako and Dakar there are 12 active checkpoints in Mali and 33 in Senegal.
  • Implementing UEMOA axleweight rules that limit trucks to 11.5 tons per axle
  • Completing road maintenance projects on the corridor. The two countries pledged to work together to identify sources of financing necessary for the projects.
  • Instituting quarterly meetings of authorities to monitor and evaluate progress, which would alternate from one country to the other USAID Trade Hub studies on the gaps in the implementation of regional trade policies provided information and insights that led to the recommendations. 

Ibrahima Ba, the director of Senegalese agro-processing company SOCODIV, participated in the study in Senegal in 2010. His company sells the products of more than 500 farmers, fishers and other agro-processors, as well as those of Malian livestock herders in the sub-region.

“It’s important to apply the rules and eliminate corruption – this will have a major impact on trade,” Ba said. “That is the point of trade – we sell our products in Mali and they have products that we need. We need to implement the rules in order to reach a sufficient level of trade.”
Posted: Mar 1, 2011
Body:

The Improved Road Transport Governance (IRTG) Initiative has released preliminary findings of its 14th report on road harassment on primary trade corridors in West Africa, reporting the level of checkpoints, bribes and delays observed from Oct. 1 to Dec. 31, 2010.

In Mali, the report shows:

  • Drivers experience 2.5 stops per 100 km at checkpoints operated by customs, police and gendarmes, which is the worst level of the six countries monitored under the joint USAID Trade Hub-UEMOA initiative (the others are Burkina Faso, Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Senegal and Togo).
  • Delays average 29 minutes per 100 km in Mali, the worst among the countries monitored.
  • The level of bribes paid in Mali is second only to Cote d’Ivoire. Between Bamako and Zégoua, drivers pay an average of 19,500 FCFA per 100 km per trip; between Bamako and Diboli, they pay 21,000 FCFA per 100 km and between Bamako and Sona, they pay 32,000 FCFA per 100 km. These amounts are paid by drivers whose vehicles have been inspected and deemed roadworthy and whose documentation is also in order – they should not  be paying any penalties at all, in effect. 

The free circulation of goods and people is far from being a reality. Numerous checkpoints along interstate corridors are obstacles to transport and trade – and harm West Africa’s ability to compete in international markets. 

Financed by USAID West Africa and jointly implemented by UEMOA and the USAID West Africa Trade Hub, the IRTG initiative began monitoring road harassment in 2005.

Posted: Sep 2, 2010
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